catinthehat

Let’s suppose that “The Cat In The Cat” was a migraine. He arrived on a rainy day, with promises of lots of fun and games. Within no time at all, he has wrecked the entire house. The fish keeps telling the children and The Cat, the he must leave. Instead of leaving, The Cat, opens a tiny box and out comes Thing One and Thing Two.

The Cat arrives on a rainy day, many people living with migraine disease, cite barometric pressure changes as one of their biggest triggers. I know that it is my biggest trigger and a very frustrating one, since I have no power over Mother Nature. Promising fun and games, that’s a good one. It sure doesn’t feel like any game I’ve ever played, while I’m worshiping at the porcelain throne. Or curled in a fetal position, with a heating pad on my stomach, trying to calm gastric distress. When my head pain is so intense, I really wonder. Could my head actually explode? Aphasia that lasts an entire day, making a simple conversation, sound as if you’re using, two tin cans and length of string to communicate. Being extremely photophobic I retreat to my cave(aka my bedroom), complete with room darkening shades and curtains. From my migraine toolbox, I can pull things that help me to be more comfortable. Ear plugs or noise cancelling headphones to block out any outside noise. A soft blanket, fans to keep me extra cool, I can’t tolerate being hot when I have an intense migraine. Medication set up and ready to use, lavender essential oil for my diffuser and even a bit of lavender linen mist, lightly misted on my pillow. The Cat often arrives and wrecks havoc on my days, but I have tools to get rid of him, though not totally. Due to the fact that I have intractable migraine, with a baseline of 4. I just started Aimovig last week, yahoo, I know that it can take at least three months, maybe longer, to see any changes. My next step is to see a doctor at the Pain Clinic, in the same building as my headache doctor, for trigger point and nerve blocks. I can’t give up and must keep looking for ways to help reduce my overall chronic pain. I have a secret weapon who won’t let me stop, she will keep on my tail, giving me a little push when need be. Thank goodness for friends that care enough, to give you that gentle nudge in the right direction.

Now for Thing One and Thing Two, they are depression and anxiety. When I’m in a long cycle of intense pain. I find myself feeling much more depressed, I refer to these times as “breakthrough depression”. It is during this time that I do not want to interact with people. Or as some have said, “I don’t feel like peopling today.”  That is okay, up to a point, when I cut myself off from people too long, that makes me feel even more depressed. Depression is a sneaky bugger, it can come out of nowhere and blindside you. Much like Thing One did, popping out of that tiny box and proceeded to turn everything upside down. If you are thinking, “this can’t happen to me, I’m on an antidepressant”, oh but it can. I’m on an antidepressant for clinical depression and have been for over three years, it doesn’t make you impervious to bouts of depression now and then. If you find yourself depressed and having a really rough time with it. Reach out to someone you trust and just talk, sharing with another person helps to lift and ease some off the load, that you’ve been carrying by yourself. If you’re not on an antidepressant, this would be a good time to reach out to your doctor, there is absolutely no shame, in seeking help for depression.

Thing Two anxiety, that voice that sometimes will just not shut up. Blah, blah, blah, on and on. Usually about the same thing, that I was sure that I had handled already. It was done and over, but evidently not to my anxiety. Then there are the panic attacks, those are a whole different animal. They don’t skedaddle very quickly, I use deep breathing exercises and make myself a cup of Chamomile tea. The act of making the tea, helps to center me, slows my breathing down. If these methods don’t work I have medication that I can use. But I always try the deep breathing exercises and tea first, they usually work for me. Some folks know what can trigger a panic attack for them, and are able to lower the number of attacks by avoiding those triggers.

 

“The sun did not shine. It was too wet to play. So we sat in the house. All that cold, cold, wet day.”  ― Dr. Seuss 

 

 

Photo: Storyblocks